Фильм Кошмар на улице Вязов (США, 2010) смотреть онлайн – Афиша-Кино

Фильм Кошмар на улице Вязов (США, 2010) смотреть онлайн – Афиша-Кино ОБД2

Adaptions and literature

A joint novelization of the 1984 film and the sequels Freddy’s Revenge and Dream Warriors was released in 1987, written by Jeffrey Cooper.[94] An eight part comic book adaption in 3D was commissioned in early 1989 to be published by Blackthorne Publishing[95] and were to be written by Andy Mangels;[96] these plans fell apart due to the collapse and bankruptcy of said publisher throughout later 1989 and 1990.

Some lost concept art was finished of this planned comic book adaption before the folding of Blackthorne;[93] Mangels explains that “Blackthorne had the 3-D rights, but they went bankrupt after I had written three issues, one had been pencilled, and none had been published”.

A 3D comic book adaption written by Mangels would eventually be released of the fifth sequel Freddy’s Dead: The Final Nightmare on Innovation Publishing.[97]

Cinematic deratives of A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) includes the two separate Bollywood horror films Khooni Murda (1989)[98] and Mahakaal (1994),[99][100] the Indonesian horror film Batas Impian Ranjang Setan or Satan’s Bed (1986)[101][102] and the American pornographic parody film named A Wet Dream on Elm Street (2021).[103][104]

Box office

A Nightmare on Elm Street premiered in the United States with a limited theatrical release on November 9, 1984, opening in 165 cinemas across the country.[82] Grossing $1,271,000 during its opening weekend, the film was considered an instant commercial success.

The film eventually earned a total of $25,504,513 at the US and Canadian box office[82] and $57 million worldwide.[4][5]

Censorship issues

When the film was submitted to the Motion Picture Association of America film rating system (MPAA), they required two cuts to grant it an R rating.[24] The theatrical version was released with an R rating and thirteen seconds of cuts.

In the United Kingdom, the film was released theatrically and on home video uncut.[71] The Australian theatrical release was edited to an M rating,[72] but the VHS home video was released uncut in 1985 with an Australian R rating.[73] The uncut version would not see a release in the United States until the 1996 Elite Entertainment Laserdisc release.[74] All DVD, digital, and Blu-ray releases use the R rated theatrical version; the uncut version has yet to be released on a digital format.[71]

Contemporaneous

In a contemporary review, Kim Newman wrote in the Monthly Film Bulletin that A Nightmare on Elm Street was closer to a Stephen King adaptation with its small-town setting, and “invented monster myth”.[1] Newman concluded that the film found “Craven emerging from the his recent career slump (Swamp Thing, The Hills Have Eyes Part 2, Invitation to Hell) with a fine, perhaps definitive bogeyman to back him up” and that the film was “a superior example of an over-worked genre”.[1]Paul Attanasio of The Washington Post praised the film, stating that “for such a low-budget movie, Nightmare on Elm Street is extraordinarily polished.

The script is consistently witty, the camera work (by cinematographer Jacques Haitkin) is crisp and expressive.”[83] The review noted that “the genre has built-in limitations… but Craven faces the challenge admirably;

A Nightmare on Elm Street is halfway between an exploitation flick and classic surrealism”. The review also commented on Freddy Krueger, calling him “the most chilling figure in the genre since ‘The Shape’ made his debut in Halloween.”[83]Variety commented that the film was “a highly imaginative horror film”, praising the special effects while finding that the film “fails to tie up his thematic threads satisfyingly at the conclusion.”[84]

Filming

Principal photography began on June 11, 1984 and lasted a total of 32 days,[28][45] in and around Los Angeles, California.[7] The high school the protagonists attend was filmed at John Marshall High School, where many other productions such as Grease and Pretty in Pink have been filmed.[46] The fictional street address of Nancy’s house in the film is 1428 Elm Street; in real life this house is a private home located in Los Angeles at 1428 North Genesee Avenue.[47][48][49] The Lantz’ family home was at 1419 North Genesee Avenue on the other side of the road.

The boiler room scenes and police station interior were shot in the Lincoln Heights Jail (closed since 1965) building, while the exterior used for the police station was Cahuenga Branch Library. The American Jewish University on 15600 Mulholland Drive was used for the Katja Institute for the Study of Sleep Disorders visited by Marge and Nancy.[50]

During production, over 500 gallons of fake blood were used for special effects production.[51] For the blood geyser sequence, the filmmakers used the same revolving room set that was used for Tina’s death.

While filming the scenes, the cameraman and Craven himself were mounted in fixed seats taken from a Datsun B-210 car while the set rotated. The film crew inverted the set and attached the camera so that it looked like the room was right side up, then they poured the red water into the room.

They used dyed water because the special effects blood did not have the right look for a geyser. During filming of this scene, the red water poured out in an unexpected way and caused the rotating room to spin. Much of the water spilled out of the bedroom window covering Craven and Langenkamp.[52] Earth’s gravity was also used to film another take for the TV version in which a skeleton shoots out from the hollowed out bed and smashes into the “ceiling”.[53]

More work was done for Freddy’s boiler room than made it into the film; the film crew constructed a whole sleeping place for Freddy, showing that he was quite a hobo, an outcast and reject from society, living and sleeping where he worked, and surrounding himself with naked Barbie dolls and other things as a showcase of his fantasies and perversions.

Freddy

Actor David Warner was originally cast to play Freddy.[32] Make-up tests were done,[33] but he had to drop out due to scheduling conflicts.

Replacing him was difficult at first. Kane Hodder, who would later be best known for playing fellow slasher icon Jason Voorhees, was among those who Wes Craven talked with about the role of Freddy. According to Hodder, “I had a meeting with Wes Craven about playing a character he was developing called Freddy Krueger.

At the time, Wes wasn’t sure what kind of person he wanted for the role of Freddy, so I had as good a shot as anybody else. He was initially thinking of a big guy for the part, and he was also thinking of somebody who had real burn scars. But obviously, he changed his whole line of thinking and went with Robert Englund, who’s smaller.

I would have loved to play the part, but I do think Wes made the right choice”. Hodder would in a way eventually play Freddy, as the hand that grabs Jason’s mask at the epilogue in Jason Goes to Hell: The Final Friday (1993).[34] Wes Craven explains that

“I couldn’t find an actor to play Freddy Krueger with the sense of ferocity I was seeking,” Craven recalled on the film’s 30th anniversary. “Everyone was too quiet, too compassionate towards children. Then Robert Englund auditioned. [He] wasn’t as tall I’d hoped, and he had baby fat on his face, but he impressed me with his willingness to go to the dark places in his mind. Robert understood Freddy.”[3]

Freddy’s theme song

The lyrics for Freddy’s theme song, sung by the jumprope children throughout the series and based on One, Two, Buckle My Shoe, was already written and included in the script when Bernstein started writing the soundtrack, while the melody for it was not set by Bernstein, but by Heather Langenkamp’s boyfriend and soon-to-be husband at the time, Alan Pasqua, who was a musician himself.

Bernstein integrated Pasqua’s contribution into his soundtrack as he saw fit.[32] One of the three girls who recorded the vocal part of the theme was Robert Shaye’s then 14-year-old daughter.[70]
Per the script, the lyrics are as follows:[10]

Further reading

  • Badley, Linda. Film, Horror, and the Body Fantastic. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1995.
  • ISBN 0-313-27523-8.

  • Baird, Robert. “The Startle Effect: Implications for Spectator Cognition and Media Theory”. Film Quarterly 53 (No. 3, Spring 2000): pp. 12–24.
  • Carroll, Noël. “The Nature of Horror.” Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 46 (No. 1, Autumn 1987): pp. 51 – 59.
  • Christensen, Kyle. “The Final Girl versus Wes Craven’s ‘A Nightmare on Elm Street’: Proposing a Stronger Model of Feminism in Slasher Horror Cinema”. Studies in Popular Culture 34 (No. 1, Fall 2021): pp. 23–47.
  • Cumbow, Robert C. Order in the Universe: The Films of John Carpenter. 2nd ed., Lanham, Md.: Scarcrow Press, 2000.
  • ISBN 0-8108-3719-6.

  • Johnson, Kenneth. “The Point of View of the Wandering Camera”. Cinema Journal 32 (No. 2, Winter 1993): pp. 49–56.
  • King, Stephen. Danse Macabre. New York: Berkley Books, 1981.
  • ISBN 0-425-10433-8.

  • Prince, Stephen, ed. The Horror Film. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 2004.
  • ISBN 0-8135-3363-5.

  • Schneider, Steven Jay, ed. Horror Film and Psychoanalysis: Freud’s Worst Nightmare. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004.
  • ISBN 0-521-82521-0.

  • Williams, Tony. Hearths of Darkness: The Family in the American Horror Film. Rutherford, N.J.: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1996.
  • ISBN 0-8386-3564-4.

Home media

The film was first introduced to the home video market by Media Home Entertainment in early 1985 and was eventually released on Laserdisc. It has since been released on DVD, first in 1999 in the United States as part of the Nightmare on Elm Street Collection box set (along with the other six sequels), and once again in a restored Infinifilm special edition in 2006, containing various special features with contributions from Wes Craven, Heather Langenkamp, John Saxon and the director of photography.

The special edition consisted of two DVDs, one with the film picture and sound restored (DTS 5.1, Dolby Digital 5.1, and original mono audio track) and another DVD with special features. Along with the restored version of the film, DVD one also had two commentaries, and other nightmares (if not all) from the film’s sequels (two through seven and Freddy Vs. Jason).

It also included additional, extended or alternate scenes of the film, such as one scene where Marge reveals to Nancy that she had another sibling who was killed by Freddy. These unused clips and scenes were not included or added to the DVD film but could be viewed separately from the DVD’s menus.

On April 13, 2021, the film was released on Blu-ray Disc by Warner Home Video,[79] with all the same extras from the 2006 special edition;[80] a DVD box set containing all of the films up to that point was released on the same day.[81]

Music

The film score was written by composer Charles Bernstein and first released in 1984 on label Varèse Sarabande.[65] The label re-released the soundtrack in 2021 in an 8-CD box for the franchise soundtracks excluding the remake[66] and again in 2021 in the 12-CD box Little Box of Horror with various other horror film scores.[67] Bernstein’s film score was also re-released in 2021, along with the soundtracks of the first seven films, on the label Death Waltz Recording Company in another 8-LP vinyl box set named A Nightmare On Elm Street:

Box Of Souls.[68] In 2021 and 2021, the label also released standalone extended versions of the soundtrack with many snippets that were left out of the original releases.[69]

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  86. ^Kelly Bulkeley, Visions of the Night: Dreams, Religion, and Psychology (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1999), p. 108; see also chap. 11: “Dreamily Deconstructing the Dream Factory: The Wizard of Oz and A Nightmare on Elm Street,” ISBN 0-7914-4283-7.
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Release

It was released in the United States on November 9, 1984 through New Line Cinema and in the United Kingdom in 1985 through Palace Pictures.[77][78]

Remake

In 2021, a remake was released, also titled A Nightmare on Elm Street, starring Jackie Earle Haley as Freddy Krueger. The film was produced by Michael Bay, directed by Samuel Bayer, and written by the team of Wesley Strick and Eric Heisserer.

On August 7, 2021, it was reported that New Line Cinema was developing a second remake with Orphan writer David Leslie Johnson.[105] Englund expressed interest in returning to the series in a cameo role.[106] Leslie Johnson later added in that the work is in limbo due to the success of The Conjuring Universe, saying that “Nothing is percolating just yet”, and “Everybody wants to see Freddy again I think, so I think it’s inevitable at some point”.[107]

Retrospective

Author Ian Conrich praised the film’s ability to rupture “the boundaries between the imaginary and real”,[85] and critic James Berardinelli said it toys with audience perceptions.[18] Kelly Bulkeley interpreted the overriding theme as a social subtext, “the struggles of adolescents in American society”.[86]

The film has a 94% approval rating based on 54 reviews on Rotten Tomatoes with and average rating of 7.70/10 and with the site’s consensus saying: “Wes Craven’s intelligent premise, combined with the horrifying visual appearance of Freddy Krueger, still causes nightmares to this day.”[87] The film is also considered one of the best of 1984 by Filmsite.org.[88] In 2021, the Independent Film &

Television Alliance selected the film as one of the 30 most significant independent films of the past 30 years.[89] It ranked at number 17 on Bravo’s The 100 Scariest Movie Moments (2004)—a five-hour program that selected cinema’s scariest moments.

In 2008, Empire ranked A Nightmare on Elm Street 162nd on their list of the 500 greatest movies of all time.[90] It also was selected by The New York Times as one of the best 1000 movies ever made.[91]

American Film Institute recognition

Themes

Freddy exclusively attacks teenagers and his actions have been interpreted as symbolic of the often traumatic experiences of adolescence.[75] Nancy, like the archetypal teenager, experiences social anxiety and her relationship with her parents becomes strained.

Sexuality is present in Freudian images and is almost exclusively displayed in a threatening and mysterious context (e.g., Tina’s death visually evokes a rape, Freddy’s glove between Nancy’s legs in the bath). The original script called for Krueger to be a child molester, rather than a child killer, before being murdered.[76]

Wes Craven has explained that “the notion of the screenplay is that the sins of the parents are visited upon the children, but the fact that each child is not necessarily stuck with their lot is still there.”[45] Robert Englund observes that “in Nightmare, all the adults are damaged:

They’re alcoholic, they’re on pills, they’re not around”. Blakley says the parents in the film “verge on being villains.” Englund adds: “the adolescents have to wade through that, and Heather is the last girl standing. She lives. She defeats Freddy.

Writing

Wes Craven began writing the screenplay for A Nightmare on Elm Street around 1981, after he had finished production on Swamp Thing (1982). He pitched it to several studios, but each one of them rejected it for different reasons.

The first studio to show interest was Walt Disney Productions, although they wanted Craven to tone down the content to make it suitable for children and preteens. Craven declined.[20][23] Another studio Craven pitched to was Paramount Pictures, which passed on the project due to its similarity to Dreamscape (1984).

Universal Studios also passed; Craven, who was in desperate personal and financial straits during this period, later framed the company’s rejection letter on the wall of his office,[3] which reads in its December 14, 1982 print:

“We have reviewed the script you have submitted, A Nightmare on Elm Street. Unfortunately, the script did not receive an enthusiastic enough response from us to go forward at this time. However, when you have a finished print, please get in touch and we would be delighted to screen it for a possible negative pick up.”[29]

Finally, the fledgling and independent New Line Cinema corporation, which had up to that point only distributed films, agreed to produce the film.[20] During filming, New Line’s distribution deal for the film fell through and for two weeks it was unable to pay its cast and crew.

Although New Line has gone on to make bigger and more profitable films, A Nightmare on Elm Street was its first commercial success and the studio is often referred to as “The House That Freddy Built”.[30][31]

New Line Cinema lacked the financial resources for the production themselves and so had to turn to external financers. They found two investors in England who each contributed 40% and 30% respectively to the necessary funds; one of the producers of The Texas Chain Saw Massacre contributed 10%, and home video distributor Media Home Entertainment contributed 20% of the original budget.

Four weeks before production began, the English investor who had contributed 40% backed out, but Media Home Entertainment added in another 40% to the budget. Among the backers were also Heron Communications and Smart Egg Pictures.[30] According to Shaye, all the film’s original investors backed out at one point or another during pre-production.

The original budget was $700,000. “It ended up at $1.1 million … half the funding came from a Yugoslavian guy[N 3] who had a girlfriend he wanted in movies.”[3]

Кошмар на улице вязов (1984)

Классика жанра “хоррор”.

Нэнси, Глену, Тине и Роду, подросткам, живущим в провинциальном городке на улице Вязов, снятся одинаковые ночные кошмары. Некто Фредди Крюгер, маньяк с обезображенным лицом, в грязном красно-зелёном свитере и серой шляпе, наводящий ужас острыми лезвиями, торчащими из перчатки, обитает вроде бы во снах, но убивает на самом деле. Тайна этого убийцы раскрывается, когда Нэнси узнаёт от матери, что Крюгер загубил многие безвинные детские души, и его сожгли на костре. Казни участвовали почти все жители городка…

Фильм кошмар на улице вязов (сша, 2021) смотреть онлайн – афиша-кино

Вы знаете Фредди? Фредди Крюгера? Он вечно ходит в полосатом красно-зелёном свитере и шляпе, а на руке – кожаная перчатка с лезвиями…

Сидя в кафешке, школьник, которому явно за 20, засыпает и видит во сне парня с обгоревшим лицом, который, без лишних слов пытается его убить. И убивает. Свидетелем становится его белокурая подруга, имя которой, как и любого другого персонажа в этом фильме, значения не имеет, просто потому что все они (почти все), рано или поздно, умрут.
С этого и начинается новая, именно новая , история о Фредди Крюгере. Фредди, который не просто убивает подростков, но который вывешивает их тела в своей котельной как трофеи. Фредди, который не похож на старого, ужасного, и, вместе с тем, такого… харизматичного злодея, которого мы все так боялись, когда были маленькими, и из-за которого не спали ночами, но от которого, вместе с тем, не могли глаз отвести.

Если честно, после просмотра захотелось много раз пересмотреть старые части, просто для того, чтобы избавиться от ощущения того, что наплевали в лицо любимому злодею.
И тут дело не только в том, что этот Фредди явно другой (и дело не только в другом актёре). Поверьте, увидев имя Майкла Бэя, который у меня стойко ассоциируется с “Пятницей” и “Трансформерами”, а следовательно, с тупой кровищей и “бдыщь-бдыщь!”, не несущим смысловой нагрузки вообще, я знала, что Фредди ничего из себя не будет представлять. Убило именно то, что испортили сам образ, историю, Крюгера.

Такое ощущение, что вся команда взяла известное имя и, не смотря предыдущие части (кроме как кусками, да. И то, первую), решили создать нам нового Фредди.

А нужен ли он этот новый Крюгер? А кому?

Ведь есть уже отличный образ харизматичного злодея. Зачем зачем его портить? Зачем изобретать велосипед, когда персонаж уже прописан? Причём, прописан отлично! Срубить бабла? Ну пересняли бы первую часть, такой какой она была. С добавлением спецэффектов.
Фредди Крюгер был маньяком, больным человеком (не спорю, педофилия тоже болезнь, но не имеет она никакого отношения к Крюгеру! Ни малейшего!), но он не был педофилом!

С детства он животных резал, потом перешёл на подростков.
Куда дели оригинальную историю?! Вот зачем переснимать хорошее, действительно хорошее кино, когда ты не можешь сделать его лучше?
Самого Фредди сделали каким-то слабоумном придурком, которого, ко всему прочему, заклинило на своих предыдущих жертвах, которые что-то там рассказали родителям очень-очень давно. В старых частях Фредди мстил родителям через их детей, потому что до самих родителей добраться не мог – они выросли!

Почему Крюгер появляется именно сейчас? Почему он с детишек переключился на явно взрослых людей? Где его шляпа? Где характер и шуточки персонажа? Где его издевательства над жертвами и чёрный юмор? Где изобретательные и действительно интересные сны? Почему, если его сожгли вовсе не в котельной, а в какой-то пристройке, он “собирает трофеи” (и зачем он их собирает?) в самой котельной? Зачем ему перчатка, если можно было обойтись огромным резиновым х*ем? В старом Фредди перчатку он сделал как орудие убийства. А тут? Вместо грабелек, которыми он огородик полол? Опять же, зачем? Какое это отношение имеет к его новой истории, к его нынешнему образу? Как все эти “подростки” могли забыть всё своё детство? Можно забыть что-то наиболее травмирующее, но не всё детство. И не всей толпой. Потому что что-то должно было остаться! Что за чушь с групповой амнезией? Если их не водили толпой на гипноз (и то не факт, что со всеми бы сработал), то быть такого не может! Что за идея матери Нэнси хранить порванное голубое платьице дочки? Как что? Мазохистское удовлетворение от того, что не защитила ребёнка? Если уж уничтожать, то уничтожать всё.

Сам Фредди, как тут уже писали, абсолютно никакой. Его лицо и те несколько фраз, которые он произносит, вызывают омерзение. Весь “ужас” сводится к парочке резких выпрыгиваний из-за угла. Момент с ванной они уничтожили в корне просто потому что не досняли его до конца. Зачем надо было его брать не понятно вообще. Образ Фредди вызывает отторжение именно из-за педофилии. То есть, его сделали таким злодеем, которого ненавидишь просто автоматически. Потому что это мерзко, неправильно и т.д. и т.п.
Актёры, абсолютно все, ничего из себя не представляют. Хочется, что бы всех их уже убили. Причём, всех, включая Фредди. Метеорит на них упал что бы. Атомная бомба. Что угодно.

Если и выпустят вторую часть, надеюсь, что она провалится в прокате. Потому что нельзя брать хороший образ и коверкать его на столько только из-за желания нахавать (именно нахавать!) побольше денег.
Фредди – культовый злодей. А вот “это” хочется убить лопатой, найти его кости, посолить, полить святой водой и сжечь. Чтобы оно никогда не воскресало.

Код ошибки:  Watch A Nightmare on Elm Street-2010 online free.
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